New Journalism

Aug 26 2014

#FergusonSyllabus and the beginning of the new school year on TTT - Wed. 8.27 9PM ET/6PM PT

Join K12 educators from CA, UT, MO, AL, MI, PA, NY talking #FergusonSyllabus & the new sch yr edtechtalk.com/ttt 9PM ET/6PM PT 8.27 #NWP 

This Wednesday at 9PM ET/6PM PT, we are gathering a small group of teachers — most of us using http://youthvoices.net — to continue talking about how we are bringing the Michael Brown shooting and Ferguson protests into our classrooms.

As you may already know, Teachers Teaching Teachers (TTT) http://edtechtalk.com/ttt is an informal webcast where we have been meeting every Wednesday at 9PM Eastern/6PM Pacific since 2006, most recently on a Google+ Hangout On Air. YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF7D01E81E9C0D94F Please subscribe: http://www.teachersteachingteachers.org/feed/podcast/

Last week Marcia Chatelain joined us to talk about her thinking around #FergusonSyllabus . http://edtechtalk.com/ttt407-welcome-back-after-ferguson-w-marcia-chatelain-karen-fasimpaur-alicia-lobaco-jo-paraiso-and 

In a recent post “5 Ways to Teach About Michael Brown and Ferguson in the New School Year” Christopher Emdin wrote just what many of us needed as we return to talk with skeptical colleagues. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/christopher-emdin/5-ways-to-teach-about-michael-brown-and-ferguson-in-the-new-school-year_b_5690171.html I know I’ll be using it this week when I return to my small transfer middle-becoming-high school in the Bronx, New Directions Secondary School.

We would love it if you could join us this Wednesday at 9PM Eastern to bring us your perspective and to help guide our conversation. Often we see TTT as a open staff meeting where all are welcomed to join. I embed the broadcast at the top of a Titanpad where people watch and discuss what we are saying.

Let me know if you would like to join us this Wednesday in our Hangout On Air at 9PM Eastern/6PM Pacific, or listen in and chat with us at http://edtechtalk.com/ttt

We’d love to have you!

Aug 24 2014
Download.

We were planning a “Welcome Back” episode on Teachers Teaching Teachers, something about how to launch connected learning with Youth Voices in our classrooms and how to be more planful about connecting our curriculum. #connectedlearning.

How do we do that after Michael Brown’s killing and the Ferguson protests? More than ever we need those days, even weeks of trust-building with our students, yet we also can’t pretend that Ferguson isn’t happening.

In addition to this webcast, we offer a small contribution with a #FergusonSyllabus http://bit.ly/1AkhCba or http://youthvoices.net/michaelbrown using Gooru, NowComment, Crocodoc, and Vialogues.

Start with your own questions, then deepen your inquiry into Michael Brown’s shooting, and the protests and confrontations in Ferguson by choosing from these articles, songs, interviews, photographs, blog posts, podcasts, reviews, videos, reports and surveys.

For this episode of TTT, Youth Voices teachers Chris Sloan, Paul Allison, Jo Paraiso, and Alicia Lobaco talk about how we are going to be launch a connected learning curriculum this year on Youth Voices http://youthvoices.net and how we are talking about and learning from Michael Brown’s shooting, the protests, and the confrontatons in Ferguson. In addition we were also joined by Dr. Marcia Chatelain, who has been organizing #FergusonSyllabus on Twitter. On LinkedIn, Marcia writes:

I am first and foremost an educator. I have been teaching high school and college students since 2003. My career goals include publishing on the experiences of women and girls in the United States, African-American women’s leadership and the relationship between food and society.

Dr. Chatelin is also a Ford Foundation Diversity Postdoctoral Fellow and she is the recipient of a 2012-2013 Ford Foundation Diversity Postdoctoral Fellowship to work on her second book on food and civil rights. She is also Assistant Professor in History

#FergusonSyllabus is a great way to connect with others who are thinking about when and how to bring the Michael Brown shooting into the curriculum.

One of the take-aways from this episode of TTT was to be reminded of the power of http://youthvoices.net for our students. It’s important to see and hear the views of students from different communities. The students in Chris Sloan’s classes in Salt Lake City and the students in Jo Paraiso’s classes in Oakland and my students in the Bronx are relatively homogeneous, and they can learn a lot from talking with students outside of their immediate school communities, especially on issues of race.


Go to EdTechTalk to see the chat that was happening during this live webcast,
and to find links to a few of the resources shared during this episode of TTT.

Aug 23 2014
dell:

Like The Wonderful Wizard of OZ, which was originally written in 1900. 

dell:

Like The Wonderful Wizard of OZ, which was originally written in 1900. 

13,371 notes

Aug 19 2014

Connected Curriculum, Youth Voices and Ferguson on Teachers Teaching Teachers - Wed. 9PM ET

This Wednesday at 6PM ET/9PM PT we were planning a “Welcome Back” episode for Teachers Teaching Teachers http://edtechtalk.com/ttt, something about how to launch connected learning with Youth Voices in our classrooms and how to be more planful about connecting our curriculum. #connectedlearning  

How do we do with that after Michael Brown’s killing and the Ferguson protests? More than ever we need those days, even weeks of trust-building with our students, yet we also can’t pretend that Ferguson isn’t happening. Oddly, I’m reminded of what it has been like figure out how to mark September 11th each school year for the past dozen years, given how quickly that day happens after school begins.

I want to invite you to come to Teachers Teaching Teachers this Wednesday at 9PM ET/6PM PT to talk about how you are going to be launching a connected learning curriculum this year, how you might be interested to join us on Youth Voices http://youtvoices.net and how you are talking about and learning from Michael Brown’s killing, the protests, and the confrontatons in Ferguson. #FergusonSyllabus   

Please watch the conversation live and join the chat athttp://edtechtalk.com/ttt at 9PM ET/6PM PT #stuvoice  #michaelbrown   #Ferguson   #NWP  

Please consider joining us directly in the conversation in the Hangout on Air. All you have to do is to let me know so that I can send you an invitation. (A link to join us will also be available at http://edtechtalk.com/ttt)

+Chris Sloan +Johanna Paraiso and her colleagues, Alicia Lobaco
and Ji Lee., plus +Raven Fenner and more are planning to join us. 

2 notes

Aug 17 2014

thevampirequeen:

Civil Rights Movement vs Ferguson Protests

136,047 notes

Jul 29 2014

Learn more about vialogues and NowComment and other digital annotation tools on Teachers Teaching Teachers on Wed. 7.30 at 9PM ET/6PM PT

Mason Hooton vialogues.com Dan Doernberg nowcomment.com on Wed 9PM ET/6PM PT digital annotation edtechtalk.com/ttt #NWP

+TERRY ELLIOTT will be joining us for a conversation about the affordances of tools like vialogues and NowComment. If you know a lot about online annotating or if these tools are new to you, please plan to join this conversation at http://edtechtalk.com/ttt on Wednesday at 9PM ET/6PM PT.

Here are a couple of provocations/invitations to practice with some of the tools we will be talking about on Wednesday:

In NowComment, I put up a short, wonderful article about Dialectical Notebooks by Ann Berthoff, an article from 30 years ago. Add your comments here: http://nowcomment.com/documents/24324

And Terry put up fascinating video on vialogues, and along with Terry, we invite you to “respond to the vialogue as one would in any close reading: response, questions, summing up, snark where appropriate, touchstone ideas.”  https://vialogues.com/vialogues/play/7800

There’s so much to learn here. We hope you will join us.

Jul 22 2014

How do we bring the excitement of the summer into our classrooms? Join us Wed. 7.23 on TTT 9PM ET/6PM PT

How will your summer work/play impact your work at school? Join  http://edtechtalk.com/ttt w/ your answers Wed 7.23 9PM ET/6PM PT #NWP #clmooc

On http://edtechtalk.com/ttt on Wed. 7.23 at 9PM ET/6PM PT, as part of our conversation about how to bridge between our summer experiences and our lives in school (detailed below) +Karen Fasimpaur will be letting us know about some of the possibilities of  the K12 Online Conference http://k12onlineconference.org/?p=2400 

Please plan to join us! 

I was in a workshop today at the New York City Writing Project and a young teacher was proudly emailing her work from that workshop to her boyfriend, “because he wants to see what teachers do in the summer!” 

I’ll bet a lot of people would like to know what we do in the summer. 

For decades, teachers have met at local sites of the National Writing Project to become writers for a few weeks, and to reflect on how this experience makes them re-think their pedagogy.

The serious, collaborative, infectious play of #clmooc last year and again this year is another example of teachers allowing themselves to do something different in the summer because they know how these experiences impact their work in the fall, winter, and spring back at school.

But does it really? How do you think your work/play/collaborations this summer will impact your teaching when you return to school?

Join us for a conversation with +Karen Fasimpaur+Grace Raffaele  and other teachers and students from #clmooc , the New York City Writing Project and beyond!

Please plan to join us at http://edtechtalk.com/ttt at 9PM ET/6PM PT on Wednesday, July 23. 

Jul 15 2014
Join us at http://edtechtalk.com/ttt on Wed. 7.16 at a special time for TTT 10AM PT/1PM ET/6PM Galway, Ireland for Part 2 of our conversation about Invent to Learn.

+Chris Sloan and educators from around the world have been gathering this summer in Galway, Ireland to discuss making in education.  

Chris writes that that they have been collaborating with the maker space 091 Labs http://091labs.com/ in Galway to play and discuss ways that constructivism and making can improve education.

Much of this work is being coordinated through Michigan State University’s Overseas MAET program http://edutech.msu.edu/programs/masters/overseas/ where Chris is a summer instructor. Chris continues: 

One of the books they have been reading is Invent to Learn by +Sylvia Martinez and +Gary Stager  http://inventtolearn.com.

We’ll be conducting a conversation via Google Hangouts on Air on July 16 at 10am Pacific/1pm Eastern (6pm Ireland). Our conversation will be broadcast on Teachers Teaching Teachershttp://edtechtalk.com/ttt and also as part of Educator Innovator’s “Summer to Make, Play, and Connect” http://makesummer.org/ and “Educator Innovator” http://educatorinnovator.org/ 

Please plan to join us!

More details from Chris Sloan:

Here are just a couple of things that have peaked our interest from the book:

Constructionism’s place in educational history that you describe so well in the opening couple of chapters especially. Your linking of making and educational theory is fascinating, especially in the authors’ frequent references to Seymour Papert, who I think is one of the most underappreciated educational thinkers ever.

We’d also like to talk about the authors’ practical suggestions for educators (e.g. Stager’s Hypothesis, What makes a good project, chapter 5, etc.)

Please join us at 10AM PT/1PM ET/6PM Galway, Ireland athttp://edtechtalk.com/ttt 

Jul 10 2014

Invent to Learn Discussion on TTT - Special Time 9AM PT/Noon ET w/ guests from Ireland


On Friday, July 11th at 9AM PT/Noon ET,  +Chris Sloan from Galway, Ireland (where it will be 5PM) and +Paul Allison will bring you a special Teachers Teaching Teachers episode, sponsored by the Summer to Make, Play, and Connect http://makesummer.org/.

Join us on Friday at http://edtechtalk.com/ttt  and ;et your friends and your networks know so that they can join us too. 

This Chris has invited some interesting educators from Ireland and Michighan to come to http://edtechtalk.com/ttt for a conversation about Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom, by Sylvia Libow Martinez & Gary Stager. Please let us know if you would like like to join us in the Hangout on Air as well!

If you have read the book, or are reading it… or would just love to talk about “making, tinkering and engineering in the classroom” please plan to join us at this special time for a TTT show: Friday July 11th 9AM Pacific/10Am Mountain/11AM Central/Noon Eastern/5PM Galway, Ireland. More times: http://goo.gl/ax7eMo

The Summer to Make, Play, and Connect is an effort to make the most of summer using an approach called Connected Learning. Connected Learning leverages the advances of the digital age to make education more relevant and meaningful — connecting academics to interests, learners to inspiring peers and mentors, and educational goals to the higher order skills the new economy demands. As part of the Summer to Make, Play and Connect, the Mozilla Foundation is leading a Maker Party effort and the National Writing Project is engaging educator innovators, in school and out, in learning opportunities featured at Educator Innovator that take place during the summer and beyond.

Jul 07 2014

INVENT TO LEARN on a special TTT, Friday at Noon ET/5PM Galway, Ireland

On Friday, July 11th we will bring you a special Teachers Teaching Teachers episode, sponsored by the Summer to Make, Play, and Connect

We need you to do three things: 1) Let us know that you want to be part of the book talk in our Hangout on Air. 2) Join us on Friday athttp://edtechtalk.com/ttt 3) Let your friends and your networks know so that they can join us too. (Please note the special day and time below.)

This Friday July 11th, join us on Teachers Teaching Teachers http://edtechtalk.com/ttt for a conversation about Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom, by Sylvia Libow Martinez & Gary Stager. Please let us know if you would like like to join us in the Hangout on Air.

If you have read the book, or are reading it… or would just love to talk about “making, tinkering and engineering in the classroom” please plan to join us at this special time for a TTT show: Friday July 11th 9AM Pacific/10Am Mountain/11AM Central/Noon Eastern/5PM Galway, Ireland (where some of our guests will be) More times: http://goo.gl/ax7eMo

The Summer to Make, Play, and Connect is an effort to make the most of summer using an approach called Connected Learning. Connected Learning leverages the advances of the digital age to make education more relevant and meaningful — connecting academics to interests, learners to inspiring peers and mentors, and educational goals to the higher order skills the new economy demands. As part of the Summer to Make, Play and Connect, the Mozilla Foundation is leading a Maker Party effort and the National Writing Project is engaging educator innovators, in school and out, in learning opportunities featured at Educator Innovator that take place during the summer and beyond.


+

Special time for Teachers Teaching Teachers - Wednesday, July 9 - 2PM ET/11AM PT

Happy Summer Vibes!

+Karen Fasimpaur and I invite you to join us on Teachers Teaching Teachers at http://edtechtalk.com/ttt this Wednesday at 2:00 PM ET/11:00 AM PT.

We will be talking about how to connect on Youth Voices more carefully through online units/6-week courses/moocs… 

Karen Fasimpaur — who will help to facilitate our Hangout on Air on Wednesday — did an amazing job of summarizing our thinking to this point.

We need you to help us push this through to even more exciting connections this fall — which starts in mid-August for some of us.

*Please go to Karen’s post and write a response: http://www.k12opened.com/blog/archives/1582*

Or respond to this post

Please let us know if you will be able to join us this Wednesday, July 9 at 2PM ET/11AM PT.

We will also be joined by six teachers who are participants in the 2014 Youth Voices Summer Program http://youthvoices.net/summer2014

Let us know what you are thinking!

Jul 05 2014

The Eight Elements of a Good Project

Purpose and Relevance. Is the project personally meaningful? Does the project prompt intrigue in the learner enough to have him or her invest time, effort, and creativity in the development of the project?

Time. Sufficient time must be provided for learners to think about, plan, execute, debug, change course, expand, and edit their projects. Class time affords students equal access to expertise and materials; projects may also need sufficient out-of-school time.

Complexity. The best projects combine multiple subject areas and call upon the prior knowledge and expertise of each student. Best of all, serendipitous insights and connections to big ideas lead to the greatest payoff for learners.

Intensity. Children have a remarkable capacity for intensity that is rarely tapped by the sliced-and-diced curriculum. Projects provide an outlet for the exercise of that intensity. Think about how long kids can spend mastering a video game, reading a favorite book series, memorizing the attributes of Pokemon, or building a tree house, and you have a good template for successful project-based learning.

Connection. During great projects students are connected to each other, experts, multiple subject areas, powerful ideas, and the world via the Web. The lessons learned during interpersonal connections that are required by collaborative projects last a lifetime. While there is some merit in organizing student groups to “teach” collaboration, a teacher can hope to create a more natural environment in which students collaborate (or do not) based on their own needs. Collaboration may consist of observing a peer, asking a quick question, or by working with the same teammates for the duration of a project.

Access. Students need access to a wide variety of concrete and digital materials anytime, anyplace. Personal student laptops make this possible, but we also need to think about the quality and quantity of craft materials, books, tools, hardware, software, and Internet access that allows learners to follow paths we may never have anticipated. When non-consumable materials are used, such as LEGO bricks, a sufficient quantity is necessary to ensure that students have everything they need for their projects and can leave the finished products together long enough for others to learn from them. The last thing you want is one student cannibalizing a classmate’s work during project creation.

Shareability. This is the big idea of project-based learning! Students need to make something that is shareable with others. This provides a great deal of motivation, relevance, perspective making, reciprocal learning, and an authentic audience for the project. “A project is something you want to share” is a sufficient definition for learners of all ages.

Novelty. Few project ideas are so profound that every child needs to engage in its development in every class, or year after year. Yes, that means that it may be time to rethink the annual marshmallow adobe project. If one student makes a fantastic discovery during a project, others can learn from it without slavishly repeating the steps of the pioneering student. In a healthy community of practice, learning continues and knowledge is shared naturally without coerced repetition.

— From Chapter 4 of Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom by Sylvia Libow Martinez & Gary Stager, Ph.D.

Jul 01 2014

Let’s talk about Sylvia Martinez’s and Gary Stager’s Invent to Learn on TTT - Wed. 7.2 at 9PM ET/6PM PT

Invent to Learn http://www.inventtolearn.com/ — Have you read it? Are you reading it? Do you want to read it? — Join authors +Sylvia Martinez  and  +Gary Stager  in a Hangout on Air or listen at http://edtechtalk.com/ttt on Wed. July 2 at 9PM ET/6PM PT. Let us know if you would like to join us in the Hangout on Air.

This episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers is sponsored by Educator Innovator educatorinnovator.org and the Summer to Make, Play and Connect http://makesummer.org .

 

In their book Sylvia Martinez and Gary Stager invite us to  *Join the maker movement!*

There’s a technological and creative revolution underway. Amazing new tools, materials and skills turn us all into makers. Using technology to make, repair or customize the things we need brings engineering, design and computer science to the masses. Fortunately for educators, this maker movement overlaps with the natural inclinations of children and the power of learning by doing. The active learner is at the center of the learning process, amplifying the best traditions of progressive education. This book helps educators bring the exciting opportunities of the maker movement to every classroom.

Children are natural tinkerers - they argue:

Their seminal learning experiences come through direct experience with materials. Digital fabrication, such as 3D printing and physical computing, including Arduino, MaKey MaKey, and Raspberry Pi, expands a child’s toy and toolboxes with new ways to make things and new things to make. For the first time ever, childhood inventions may be printed, programmed or imbued with interactivity. Recycled materials can be brought back to life.

While school traditionally separates art and science, theory and practice, such divisions are artificial. The real world just doesn’t work that way! Architects are artists. Craftsmen deal in aesthetics, tradition and mathematical precision. Video game developers rely on computer science. Engineering and industrial design are inseparable. The finest scientists are often accomplished musicians. The maker community brings children, hobbyists and professionals together in a glorious celebration of personal expression with a modern flare.

When 3-D printing, precision cutting, microcomputer control, robotics and computer programming become integral to the art studio, auto shop or physics lab, every student needs access to tools, knowledge and problem solving skills. The maker movement not only blurs the artificial boundaries between subject areas, it erases distinctions between art and science while most importantly obliterating the crippling practice of tracking students in academic pursuits or vocational training. There are now multiple pathways to learning what we have always taught and things to do that were unimaginable just a few years ago.

In their book, Sylvia Martinez and Gary Stager also show us examples of Making for every classroom budget

Even if you don’t have access to expensive (but increasingly affordable) hardware, every classroom can become a makerspace where kids and teachers learn together through direct experience with an assortment of high and low-tech materials. The potential range, breadth, power, complexity and beauty of projects has never been greater thanks to the amazing new tools, materials, ingenuity and playfulness you will encounter in this book.

In this practical guide, Sylvia Martinez and Gary Stager provide K-12 educators with the how, why, and cool stuff that supports classroom making.

Find out more: http://www.inventtolearn.com/

And join Sylvia Martinez and Gary Stager and others who have… are… or plan to read the book on Wednesday, July 2 at 9PM ET/6PM PT on Teachers Teaching Teachers http://edtechtealk.com/ttt

Let us know if you want to join us in the Hangout.

Jun 29 2014

Join a book discussion on Invent to Learn with Sylvia Martinez and Gary Stager on TTT - Wed. 7.2 at 9PM ET/6PM PT

Invent to Learn http://www.inventtolearn.com/ — Have you read it? Are you reading it? Do you want to read it? — Join authors +Sylvia Martinez and +Gary Stager on http://edtechtalk.com/ttt on Wed. July 2 at 9PM ET/6PM PT. Let us know if you would like to join us in the Hangout on Air.

In their book Sylvia Martinez and Gary Stager invite to  *Join the maker movement!*

There’s a technological and creative revolution underway. Amazing new tools, materials and skills turn us all into makers. Using technology to make, repair or customize the things we need brings engineering, design and computer science to the masses. Fortunately for educators, this maker movement overlaps with the natural inclinations of children and the power of learning by doing. The active learner is at the center of the learning process, amplifying the best traditions of progressive education. This book helps educators bring the exciting opportunities of the maker movement to every classroom.

Children are natural tinkerers - they argue:

Their seminal learning experiences come through direct experience with materials. Digital fabrication, such as 3D printing and physical computing, including Arduino, MaKey MaKey, and Raspberry Pi, expands a child’s toy and toolboxes with new ways to make things and new things to make. For the first time ever, childhood inventions may be printed, programmed or imbued with interactivity. Recycled materials can be brought back to life.

While school traditionally separates art and science, theory and practice, such divisions are artificial. The real world just doesn’t work that way! Architects are artists. Craftsmen deal in aesthetics, tradition and mathematical precision. Video game developers rely on computer science. Engineering and industrial design are inseparable. The finest scientists are often accomplished musicians. The maker community brings children, hobbyists and professionals together in a glorious celebration of personal expression with a modern flare.

When 3-D printing, precision cutting, microcomputer control, robotics and computer programming become integral to the art studio, auto shop or physics lab, every student needs access to tools, knowledge and problem solving skills. The maker movement not only blurs the artificial boundaries between subject areas, it erases distinctions between art and science while most importantly obliterating the crippling practice of tracking students in academic pursuits or vocational training. There are now multiple pathways to learning what we have always taught and things to do that were unimaginable just a few years ago.

In their book, Sylvia Martinez and Gary Stager also show us examples of Making for every classroom budget

Even if you don’t have access to expensive (but increasingly affordable) hardware, every classroom can become a makerspace where kids and teachers learn together through direct experience with an assortment of high and low-tech materials. The potential range, breadth, power, complexity and beauty of projects has never been greater thanks to the amazing new tools, materials, ingenuity and playfulness you will encounter in this book.

In this practical guide, Sylvia Martinez and Gary Stager provide K-12 educators with the how, why, and cool stuff that supports classroom making.

Find out more: http://www.inventtolearn.com/

And join Sylvia Martinez and Gary Stager and others who have… are… or plan to read the book on Wednesday, July 2 at 9PM ET/6PM PT on Teachers Teaching Teachers http://edtechtealk.com/ttt

Let us know if you want to join us in the Hangout.

Jun 24 2014

What’s up with your summer? Join us on TTT to talk about your plans. Wed. 9PM ET/6PM PT

Hi Friends!

 and I would love to have you join Teachers Teaching Teachers on Wednesday, June 25 at 9PM ET/6PM PT.

We just plan to talk about what you are doing this summer… maybe it’s #clmooc… or an institute at your local Writing Project… or anything else that comes up.

http://edtechtalk.com/ttt

Please let us know if you will be able to join this Hangout on Air!

— 
Paul Allison, Monika Hardy, and Chris Sloan

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